Archive for December, 2008

Learning wildlife photography – Getting close

Posted on 30. Dec, 2008 by .

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Getting close – There can be few things more frustrating than figuring out how to get close to wildlife. One option is to photograph captive animals at a game farm, animal park or zoo. Another is to go to places where the animals are known to congregate fairly reliably like a wildlife refuge’s blind or attend a wildlife photography tour. And the third method, and the one that takes the most effort by the photographer, is to learn about the animals, learn where they are likely…

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Learning wildlife photography – Lighting

Posted on 29. Dec, 2008 by .

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Lighting – Learning to see the light and interpret how it will look in an image is a critical skill for a wildlife photographer. The early and late light of the day is often the best light of the day and fortunately coincides with the times when many animals are most active. On the other hand, photographing under high overcast skies…

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Learning wildlife photography – Composition

Posted on 27. Dec, 2008 by .

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Composition – Like all types of photography, the way a wildlife photograph is composed creates the drama and interest in a captivating image. The space around an animal and the angle you photograph an animal from are all important considerations.

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Learning wildlife photography – The three P’s

Posted on 24. Dec, 2008 by .

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The three P’s are (in no particular order), patience, patience and finally patience.

In my experience, there is no other commodity of more value to the wildlife photographer than patience; the patience to get up early to meet the sunrise and find some wildlife, only to discover that the animals have missed the appointment; the patience to find a cooperative subject who doesn’t flee on site; the patience to watch and learn an animal’s behaviour. And, the patience to keep persevering when, after all other conditions were perfect, it just wasn’t the day for any compelling images to be made.

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Learning wildlife photograhy – Natural history

Posted on 23. Dec, 2008 by .

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Natural History – Members of the public are often amazed at the great wildlife photographs they see. When a casual photographer gets close enough to take wildlife shots they are often frustrated at the images they produce. A professional wildlife photographer has learned where to go to find the photographic opportunities and developed a knack for anticipating behaviours. It is through this anticipation and experience that truly memorable behavioural shots are created.

One approach to wildlife photography is to drive randomly around a location hoping to come across something worth photograhing. Another approach, and the one I prefer, is to do some research. I’ll target a species or two that I’m interested in photographing. Then I’ll spend some time Googling for information about the species to learn their habits and the sort of locales they tend to hand out. With that information in hand I’ll build myself a route to follow that is most likely to give me an opportunity to photograph the species I’m looking for.

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Learning wildlife photography – Equipment considerations

Posted on 22. Dec, 2008 by .

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Equipment – Photographing wildlife is often characterized by long periods of inaction, followed by a short period of action and then a return to inaction. If you need to fumble with your equipment to get your subject in focus, or to dial in the correct exposure, you’re going to miss opportunities and those unique shots. Practice and more practice is the prescription for improving and maintaining your skills.

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Merry Christmas from WildShots & PaulBurwell.com

Posted on 19. Dec, 2008 by .

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I’m a bad one for getting my Christmas cards out. I always leave it until the last minute and then I scramble to create something I’m happy with. This year I was waiting until I had a new winter image I liked that I thought could make a nice base for the company Christmas card.

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Photoshop Tutorial-Straightening images with reflections

Posted on 18. Dec, 2008 by .

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I try to keep my horizons level. Really I do. But I’ll be the first to admit that I must have a crooked way of looking at the world because more often than not, many of my wildlife images require a bit of straightening. I do have a bubble level and use it on my landscape shots. But when I’m photographing wildlife I find I’m concentrating too much on the viewfinder to check the level.

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